The Barn

Seeing the picture of this 1920’s barn brings back a lot of fond childhood memories of time spent in my grandparents barn. It has been a lifetime ago but I can still remember climbing the stairs to the hay-filled loft and swinging on the stall gates. As a child, I saw my grandparents’ barn as a big maze. There were doors and openings that I perceived as secret passages. I would spend hours playing hide and seek with the cousins. My first kiss, an innocent peck on the cheek from a childhood friend, was embarrassingly received in a barn loft. As many precious memories as I have of time spent on the farm, sadly my own children missed out as my grandparents have since passed and the old barn has been torn down.

 We’ve seen a great deal of interest lately in salvaged barn wood. We don’t think the interest is fueled as much by the “green movement” as it is by our desire to salvage fond memories of simpler times. We just brought back 126 pieces of red and white oak taken from this Hudson, Indiana barn which was recently disassembled. The planks are in great condition and can be cut in widths for use as a wall or ceiling covering. We used salvaged barn wood on the walls and ceiling in part of The Green House that we recently renovated (pictured right).

The barn wood is a small sample of our salvaged wood collection. Our wood storage facility formerly served as the Wallace State basketball gym. We’ve raised the goals and the old score boards are still hanging on the walls. Where fans once cheered and players raced down the court, pallets of usable wood salvaged from old barns and buildings sit waiting to be turned into beautiful flooring, furniture or works of art.

We have created a pin board on our Pinterest page showcasing re-purposed barn wood. It is filled with creative ways this salvaged wood has been used to create stunning furniture, flooring, frames and other useful items. We invite you to browse our board as well as send us pictures of how you have preserved history or perhaps fond memories by giving new life to old wood.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: