Monthly Archives: October 2014

Chapel Market or Bust!

We loading up the truck last week and hit the road early Friday morning for our last road trip of the year! Southern Accents was at The Chapel Market this past Saturday, October 25, 2014. The Chapel Market was held in a stunningly gorgeous neighborhood in Pike Road, Alabama, located just outside of Montgomery. Layla Palmer of The Lettered Cottage blog was the event organizer. This year’s market drew an incredible crowd of happy shoppers! Southern Accents was one of 17 vendors offering a varied selection of “vintage goods and pretty little things!” Saturday turned out to be a gorgeous day and we are so thankful for everyone who stopped by our booth. We really appreciate everyone who made a point of letting us know that they read our newsletters and follow us on our social media accounts. We were SO busy Saturday helping shoppers and visiting with so many of you that we didn’t have an opportunity to snap any pictures once the gates opened! We did however take just a few on Friday. If you weren’t able to attend, this is what you missed in our corner of the tent!

A few of the goodies we loaded and took to Chapel Market!

A few of the goodies we loaded and took to Chapel Market!

This was the scene early Saturday morning as we entered the market venue!

This was the scene early Saturday morning as we entered the market venue!

Exact same entrance location... just the opposite side of the road!  What a view!

Exact same entrance location… just the opposite side of the road! What a view!

We worked hard all day Friday setting up our booth.

We worked hard all day Friday setting up our booth.

It was great to have our Cullman neighbors, Littleville Blue in the booth next to us!

It was great to have our Cullman neighbors, Littleville Blue in the booth next to us!

The guys in the SA wood shop worked hard all week making a variety of beautiful items from some of our reclaimed wood.

The guys in the SA wood shop worked hard all week making a variety of beautiful items from some of our reclaimed wood.

Thanks to our wonderful friend Kim Whittaker! Kim brought her gorgeous Haul Couture bags and hung out with us for this event.

Thanks to our wonderful friend Kim Whittaker! Kim brought her gorgeous Haul Couture bags and hung out with us for this event.

The weather was perfect! Lots of sunshine!

The weather was perfect! Lots of sunshine!

Our booth this year was outside under a big tent which meant that we were able to "spread out"!

Our booth this year was outside under a big tent which meant that we were able to “spread out”!

If you missed this awesome event, make sure that you are on our mailing list so that you know about all of Southern Accents adventures! To sign up, simply visit us online at sa1969.com. You can sign up on our front page.

Written by: Lisa Jones

 


DIY – How To Patina Copper

Southern Accents has an incredibly talented team of artists and craftsmen who are constantly coming up with creative ideas. Recently, we decided to add a bit more interest to a four panel, round top door that we custom built from cypress wood. SA Team member Josh Howe came up with the idea of covering the panels with patina’d copper. He had several scrap pieces of shiny copper in the wood shop. All that was needed was a method of aging the copper. Josh did a little experimenting and the end result was so fantastic that we decided to share his recipe!

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

The process of aging the copper so that it gives off that lovely blue/green hue is fairly simple. It is a matter of treating the copper with an acid then allowing it to oxidize. The specific form of acid used will result in different color changes within the copper. While there are several chemical compounds you could purchase, Josh used a mixture of common household ingredients: vinegar, ammonia, and kosher salt.

Josh started with a clean, quart sized spray bottle purchased at our local hardware store. He filled the bottle with approximately 1/2 inch of salt. He then added equal parts of vinegar and ammonia to the bottle, leaving enough room at the top to be able to throughly shake the mixture until the salt was completely dissolved. The copper was cleaned and degreased using a lacquer thinner. The cleaned sheets were then taken outside and sprayed with the acid mixture and placed in the sun to dry. Heating the treated copper speeds up the oxidation process. While we took advantage of a sunny day you could use something as simple as a hair dryer to heat the metal. Depending on the desired result, the copper may need more than one treatment. Once the desired color was achieved, the copper was rinsed with warm water, dried, and sealed. If the copper is to be used outdoors we recommend a spar urethan which offers UV protection. For interior use, any clear sealant will do. When treating the copper, if the desired color change is not achieved with multiple treatments, scuffing the copper just a bit with a piece of steel wool will open up the metal pores allowing it to more readily absorb the acid mixture.

The copper we used was originally purchased from a local air conditioning company and was approximately 1/16″ thick. You can also use copper flashing from the hardware store. Do not however use the copper foils commonly found in craft stores as these are too thin and the acid will likely eat a hole right through these sheets.

Southern Accents Architectural AntiquesThe method we used is one of many that could be used to create a lovely patina on copper. This process is not limited for use on copper sheets, but can be used to antique any copper item. Old copper pots, pans, pennies, bowls and other finds you may want to use as decorative items can be treated using this method.

To add another dimension to your creation, before you treat the copper with the acid solution, paint on a design using a cotton swab and petroleum jelly. Every spot covered in the petroleum jelly should remain shiny!

Copper is such a versatile metal. In addition to the beautiful colors it emits when oxidized, it can be etched, hammered, and molded into almost any shape. We’ve added a board to our Pinterest page filled with crafting and DIY projects using copper as well as a few pins on additional ways to add a gorgeous patina to this fabulous metal!

Written by: Lisa Jones


Salvage Design & Dine!

One of the things that Southern Accents enjoys most is the opportunity to collaborate with businesses who have an interest in incorporating salvaged materials into the design of their establishment. While we have worked with a variety of businesses, the past several years we have been given the opportunity to work with a number of restaurants. We’ve done everything from just supplying materials to participating in the design process. This week we are delivering finished products to one of our latest customer collaborations: PoFolks Restaurant in Pensacola, Florida.

Salvaged wood booth table tops custom built by Southern Accents for PoFolks in Pensacola, Florida.

Salvaged wood booth table tops custom built by Southern Accents for PoFolks in Pensacola, Florida.

Recently, interior designer Lori Bates traveled from Panama City Beach, Florida to Cullman, Alabama to meet with Southern Accents owner, Garlan Gudger. Lori had scheduled an appointment specifically to browse our selection of salvaged materials and discuss design options for PoFolks in Pensacola. After Lori shared her design concept with Garlan, a trip to SA’s wood warehouse resulted in the selection of the perfect stack of salvaged wood that would be used to create booth table tops for the restaurant. SA team members Josh and Tyler worked hard to transform the wood stack into these gorgeous table tops. The aged wood was cleaned, cut, assembled, framed and then finished with a thick coat of epoxy. One end of each top will be mounted directly to the wall with a supporting leg attached to the other end.

Salvaged wood wall art, custom built for PoFolks in Pensacola, Florida.

Salvaged wood wall art, custom built for PoFolks in Pensacola, Florida.

In addition to the table tops, Lori had a design that Tyler and local artist Leldon Maxcy, worked together to build. This unique artwork will hang on PoFolks wall. Leldon scrolled the large State of Florida cutout that was then attached to a framed canvas, all made from salvaged wood trim and beadboard from Southern Accents.

Cornice board built from salvaged trim and industrial wood thread spools.

Cornice board built from salvaged trim and industrial wood thread spools.

One other custom creation that is on it’s way to PoFolks in Pensacola is this fabulous cornice board! Salvaged industrial wooden thread spools were cut and attached to a piece of salvaged trim to create this gorgeous board. The wood pegs will hold custom burlap curtains over a large window.

Curtain tie backs built to match the cornice board.

Curtain tie backs built to match the cornice board.

Curtain pull backs were made to match using one of the wood spools. We can’t wait to see pictures from PoFolks of their finished project!

Salvaged industrial wood thread spools.

Salvaged industrial wood thread spools.

Interested in the industrial wood spools? We currently have about 1,000 of them! Each solid wood spool is approximately 9″ long. They are available in a variety of colors for only $8 each. Stop by the showroom or give us a call… we ship!

If you are looking to incorporate salvaged materials in your next project and are interested in a one-on-one consultation, give us a call. We can be reached at 877 737-0554 during regular business hours. Makenzie will take your request and contact information and get back with you to schedule your appointment!

Written by: Lisa Jones


Knobs Of A Different Color

Knobs Of A Different Color

Southern Accents owner, Garlan Gudger, Jr., has a fascination with door knobs. He’s been collecting them since he was a child. Much of his prized collection is on display in the SA showroom in Cullman, Alabama. While Garlan is passionate about salvaging architectural antiques, question him about the door knobs and you will discover that he has a wealth of information along with many interesting stories about them. One such story is a tale about porcelain knobs that serves as a stark reminder of a period in American history that will never be forgotten.

blog-coloredknobs

In the early 1850’s, a variety of mineral knobs were patented in black, white, and brown colors. The knobs were made of porcelain mixed with minerals which created a material that was harder and more durable than its wooden predecessors. These knobs were commonly used in rural farm homes, as well as the service areas of wealthy plantation homes. The tale that has been passed down through door knob collectors is that the color of the door knob indicated who was allowed to enter. People of color were allowed to enter if the door knob was black. White knobs designated “white only” entrances and a brown knob symbolized an entry accessible to both skin tones. If you visit an architectural salvage store, there are always more black and white porcelain knobs than brown, a fact that lends credence to this tale.

History is written for those yet to come. The accurate recording of historical events is important lest we forget. While we do not know if the tale of the colored porcelain knobs is factual, it does serve as a reminder. A reminder that we live in a country made up of a remarkable diversity of creative people. “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” ― Martin Luther King Jr.

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

The beautiful brown porcelain door knob shown above is known as a Bennington knob. These knobs were created in a factory in Bennington, Vermont. A mineral was swirled with a brown clay mixture to create a unique pattern. While all brown knobs with this swirl pattern are known as a Bennington, a true Bennington knob has a cream base and is a nice, rare find!

Written by: Lisa Jones

 


Road Trip!

Southern Accents was on the road last week on a “picking” trip! A “picking” trip, unlike a salvage mission, is when we go in search of vintage and antique architectural items that have already been salvaged. This trip took us north around the Philly area. These areas are rich, in history and architecture, because they were home to some of the first English settlements in the 1600’s. Several days on the road with many stops along the way left us with a truck full of fabulous finds!

A few of our fabulous finds from Philly!

A few of our fabulous finds from Philly!

Check our New Arrivals page. We’ve already added tons of awesome finds from this trip with more to come!

 


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