Monthly Archives: February 2015

Milling Around

Southern Accents has been a family owned and operated business since 1969. Second generation owner, Garlan Gudger, Jr., saw the need last year to take SA’s salvage operations to the next level by adding the ability to mill our own salvage lumber.

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

A growing part of Southern Accents business is salvage wood. One mile from the showroom, on Janeway Drive, sits our warehouse, fully stocked with salvaged barn wood, bead board, beams, fireplace timbers and more. As people are becoming more environmentally aware, the demand for salvage and repurposed wood continues to grow. The patina and beauty of naturally aged wood is simply unmatched. When using the wood for flooring, most want the antique wood milled. Milling the wood ensures that the planks are uniform in width and thickness. It can also give the wood a “clean” face and open up the wood pores, allowing it to be more susceptible to receiving stains and finishes. Having our own mill allows us the ability to fulfill custom orders more quickly and efficiently.

Stop by our wood warehouse and shop one of the largest selections of salvaged wood available in the Southeast! Our warehouse is open Tues-Fri from 9 to 5 and Sat from 10 to 4.

Our current wood stock includes this gorgeous chippy paint breadboard recently salvaged from Selma, Alabama. We have approximately 3,000 square feet while supplies last, priced at $1.00 per linear foot. There is a mix of colors that include white, grey, avocado, haint blue, electric blue, lime green. The salvaged breadboard is a popular choice for wall and ceiling coverings as well as an endless number of craft and DIY projects, including frames, headboards, and more. The ends have been cut and the wood is ready to be repurposed!

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

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Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques


Salvage Project Video/Picture Tour

Last week we posted a video tour of one of our latest salvage projects, an 1884 Second Empire style house in South Carolina. You can view the YouTube video here.

We have begun a process of documenting our salvage projects in an effort to preserve the memory of these structures for future generations. Part of our documentation process includes lots of photographs! Since posting the video, we have had numerous requests for photos. Here’s a few of the photos used in the video along with descriptions. Enjoy!

1884 Empire Style structure with 1920's Neo-Classical additions

1884 Empire Style structure with 1920’s Neo-Classical additions

The house has been unoccupied for approximately 10 years

The house has been unoccupied for approximately 10 years

Remains of what use to be a formal garden can be seen from this side view of the house

Remains of what use to be a formal garden can be seen from this side view of the house

Approximately 1 year ago, the house received significant damage when several large trees fell on top of it

Approximately 1 year ago, the house received significant damage when several large trees fell on top of it

In addition to the main house, the 6 acre lot includes a tea house and well house.

In addition to the main house, the 6 acre lot includes a tea house and well house.

The tea house served as the focal point of many garden parties and festivals that were held on the property

The tea house served as the focal point of many garden parties and festivals that were held on the property

Inside view of the tea house

Inside view of the tea house

Well house

Well house

This small structure housed the very first fire hydrant to be installed in  the area

This small structure housed the very first fire hydrant to be installed in the area

Front foyer.

Front foyer.

One of two keeping rooms located at the front of the house

One of two keeping rooms located at the front of the house

Second keeping room

Second keeping room

Family room located on the ground floor

Family room located on the ground floor

Ground floor bedroom

Ground floor bedroom

Ground floor bath

Ground floor bath

Formal dining room. The dark spots on the wallpaper is mold

Formal dining room. The dark spots on the wallpaper is mold

The original kitchen was detached from the house. This kitchen was added, probably in the 1920's, when other changes/additions to the house were made

The original kitchen was detached from the house. This kitchen was added, probably in the 1920’s, when other changes/additions to the house were made

This was originally an open breezeway between the house and the original kitchen. The breezeway was later enclosed.

This was originally an open breezeway between the house and the original kitchen. The breezeway was later enclosed.

This kitchen, original to the house,  was once detached

This kitchen, original to the house, was once detached

Cellar

Cellar

Stairway leading to the second story

Stairway leading to the second story

Second story hallway

Second story hallway

One of six second story bedrooms

One of six second story bedrooms

Bedroom

Bedroom

One of two upstairs baths

One of two upstairs baths

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bath

Bath

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom

This room was once a nursery but was later turned into a library room

This room was once a nursery but was later turned into a library room

Stairs leading to the attic

Stairs leading to the attic

The attic

The attic

In this corner of the attic you can see an exposed area from where the house was damaged.

In this corner of the attic you can see an exposed area from where the house was damaged.

Room off of the attic and stairway leading to the upper room

Room off of the attic and stairway leading to the upper room

Upper room. From this room you can see the back side of the slate roof tiles.

Upper room. From this room you can see the back side of the slate roof tiles.

Remains of what use to be a playhouse

Remains of what use to be a playhouse

Two door garage

Two door garage

Remains of the entrance to the root cellar

Remains of the entrance to the root cellar

Brick chimney on the back side of the property which we believe is the only remains of what use to be the help's quarters

Brick chimney on the back side of the property which we believe is the only remains of what use to be the help’s quarters

The SA Team on our first visit to Spartanburg

The SA Team on our first visit to Spartanburg

Photography by Lisa Jones. All photos copyright 2015, Southern Accents Architectural Antiques. All rights reserved.


The “What” of What We Salvage

A question we are often asked regarding our salvage projects is, “What all do you salvage from a house?” To answer that question… We will salvage any architectural element from a structure that can be safely removed in good enough condition that we believe can be reused or repurposed. Architectural elements can include any or all of the following: doors and accompanying hardware, door frames with trim, crown molding, wainscoting, fireplace mantels, sinks, tubs, light fixtures, wood flooring, floor joists, baseboards, wood walls, wood beams, newel posts, stairways and railings, decorative wood trim, decorative tile, ceiling medallions, porch posts and columns, windows, garden gates, iron fencing and at times brick and stone.

Quite often, before we can begin a new salvage project, the first thing we do is remove items from the house that have been left behind. Most often these are small items or furniture that have been stored away in the attic. Once these items have been removed, the real work begins. When salvaging a house, we basically “deconstruct” it. The first elements that we remove are typically the last elements that were installed in the house such as interior doors, mantels, bath and light fixtures. Once these items are removed, we then begin pulling the wood. We start at the top of multi level structures and work our way down. The last items taken are structural elements such as wood beams, columns, and posts.

Most often the property owner will schedule a demolition company to come in right behind us. If we are salvaging brick or stone from the structure, we will often coordinate those efforts with the demolition crew.

We are typically given a set amount of time to save what we can. At times we may only have a single day! Several years ago we were given the opportunity to salvage wood from a house that was scheduled for demolition. We worked hard for a full day pulling as much wood as we could. We arrived on day two to continue our efforts only to discover that the fire department had already set the structure ablaze! Once we begin a new project we work as efficiently as possible to ensure that we are able to save as many elements as possible.

We believe our work here at Southern Accents is truly preserving our history through salvage. We’ve recently added items to our New Arrivals page that were saved during phase I of our latest salvage project. In the coming days, we will be returning for phase II. Make sure you are following along with us on our social media accounts as we continue what will be our largest salvage project to date!

Here are a few of our latest finds!

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

 

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques

 

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques


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